Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Latest

No.519 March 20, 2022
  • Deep Ocean Circulation Guided by the Moon
    HIBIYA Toshiyuki
    Professor, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo / Recipient, 14th National Maritime Award
  • Regional Capability and the Ocean
    ISHIKAWA Satoshi
    Professor, Department of Environmental and Societal Affairs, School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University
  • Fishing Operations in Ancient and Medieval Times and Their Coastal Environments
    SASOU Mamoru
    Professor, Department of Shinto Studies, Faculty of Shinto Studies, Kokugakuin University

Deep Ocean Circulation Guided by the Moon

HIBIYA Toshiyuki
Professor, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo / Recipient, 14th National Maritime Award

Deep ocean circulation, which regulates long-term climate change, is highly controlled by microscale turbulent mixing in the deep ocean. However, given our understanding of turbulence intensity, it should not be possible for it to regulate deep ocean circulation, which has a flow rate of about 20 million tons per second. In this article, I would like to introduce a new theory that could lead to a solution to the deficient turbulence intensity problem of “missing mixing,” which has long been a bottleneck in deep ocean circulation mechanics.

Regional Capability and the Ocean

ISHIKAWA Satoshi
Professor, Department of Environmental and Societal Affairs, School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University

I feel that what’s behind the problem of the declining quality of biological resources is that those resources which can be used directly are being prioritized for economic growth, with less consideration for organisms deemed to have lower market value. I think that improving Area-Capability, by increasing the number of resources that can be used in a particular area and the number of people who use and steward those resources, is important for regional sustainable development.

Fishing Operations in Ancient and Medieval Times and Their Coastal Environments

SASOU Mamoru
Professor, Department of Shinto Studies, Faculty of Shinto Studies, Kokugakuin University

Changes in seashore environments caused by climate variation were closely related to transitions in Boso fishing practices. As ridges formed on seashores due to climate variation, new settlements were established as centers of fishing operations. At the same time, fishermen and innovative fishing technologies were introduced from other regions, in Boso’s case the Tokai and Kinki regions, and new seafood distribution routes were created. Man’s fishing activities have evolved in delicate balance with the natural environment of seas and seashores.

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