Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.502 July 5, 2021
  • Towards the Development of a Carbon Regeneration Cycle Utilizing Seaweed
    SENAHA Izuru
    Professor, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus / President, Retech Flow
  • 50 Years Since Adopting the Ramsar Convention
    HORI Ryoichi
    Director, Ramsar Network Japan
  • Digitalizing the Archives of the Yamato Museum and Opening them to the Public
    HAMANA Shohei
    Curator, Kure Maritime Museum (Yamato Museum)

Towards the Development of a Carbon Regeneration Cycle Utilizing Seaweed

SENAHA Izuru
Professor, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus / President, Retech Flow

In order to realize a decarbonized society, advancements are being made towards developments in CO2 recovery and carbon regeneration cycles. As a part of that process, technological developments have been made in seaweed cultivation, which utilizes seawater with a high concentration of dissolved CO2. Using this technology, the average yearly production of umi-budo, a characteristic seaweed of Okinawa, increased by about 1.5 times. Furthermore, there are efforts towards developing technologies for fully automated aquaculture and the removal of microplastics by harnessing the power of IoT/AI.

50 Years Since Adopting the Ramsar Convention

HORI Ryoichi
Director, Ramsar Network Japan

The Ramsar Convention adopted on February 2, 1971, in Ramsar, Iran, is a pioneer in international treaties for environmental conservation. As this was a time before the appearance of the word “sustainability”, the expression “the wise use of” was used. Wetlands, which are the focus of the Convention, are vanishing at a rate three times that of forests despite their being essential in the conservation of biodiversity. It is important that many people understand the benefits which wetlands provide.

Digitalizing the Archives of the Yamato Museum and Opening them to the Public

HAMANA Shohei
Curator, Kure Maritime Museum (Yamato Museum)

The Yamato Museum (Kure Maritime Museum) of Kure City, Hiroshima Prefecture, opened in 2005 with the goal of communicating science and technology that focuses on Kure’s history and shipbuilding. The museum collects and preserves those documents related to the Japanese Navy and Kure City that escaped being destroyed by fire or scattered and lost. As we progress in digitalizing the paper-based archives (pictures, blueprints, written documents), I would like here to introduce details about their preservation and how they are being shared over the internet.

pagetop