Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.475 May 20, 2020
  • FAO’s Sustainable Fisheries Initiative
    WATANABE Hiromoto
    Senior Fisheries Officer, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
  • Opening of the New National Museum of Territory and Sovereignty
    TAKAI Susumu
    Special Research Fellow, Ocean Policy Research Institute, The Sasakawa Peace Foundation
    Selected Papers No.26
  • "Bringing the Ocean into the Classroom" Project —sea urchins as an opportunity for ocean education—
    KIYOMOTO Masato
    Director, Marine and Coastal Research Center, Ochanomizu University

FAO’s Sustainable Fisheries Initiative

WATANABE Hiromoto
Senior Fisheries Officer, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

The FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative (BGI) is an action plan focused especially on the field of fisheries, that seeks to promote food security, eradication of poverty, and sustainable fisheries management based on its Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The Blue Fashion, a component of the initiative, seeks to create new sources of revenue for coastal communities through exploiting heretofore rarely used fishery resources, such as fish skin leather, to increase the added value of capture fisheries and aquaculture products.

Opening of the New National Museum of Territory and Sovereignty

TAKAI Susumu
Special Research Fellow, Ocean Policy Research Institute, The Sasakawa Peace Foundation

The new National Museum of Territory and Sovereignty was opened by the Japanese government in Tokyo’s Toranomon district on January 20th 2020 to serve as an information center regarding Japan’s position on island territory. Panel displays illustrate clearly the historical facts incorporating the Northern Territories, Takeshima Islands, and the Senkakus as Japanese territory, and are accompanied by verifying documentation. It is expected that such thorough dissemination of historical facts and documents and information, aimed both domestically and abroad, will result in publicizing accurate understanding that the three islands are indisputably inherent parts of the territory of Japan.
Selected Papers No.26

"Bringing the Ocean into the Classroom" Project —sea urchins as an opportunity for ocean education—

KIYOMOTO Masato
Director, Marine and Coastal Research Center, Ochanomizu University

Sea Urchins are particularly suitable for animal development observations and so are introduced in school textbooks. The process from fertilization to the body emerging from the egg can be clearly observed over a relatively short period of time even with a regular microscope, and the larva can be raised to an adult state within a small container. We have developed a new way to provide samples, which solves the problems of obtaining samples and of breeding facilities that face schools in implementation. This article introduces a movement to spread ocean education through recreating the living environments of marine creatures in the classroom.

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