Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.474 May 5, 2020
  • Ben P. Harvey
    Assistant Professor, Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba
  • The Real Image of Nami no Ihachi, as Seen from an Ocean Perspective
    ISHIKAWA Takeo
    Director, Kamogawa City Folk Museum, Chiba Prefecture
  • Introducing Ocean Education to Landlocked Areas
    SATO Hiroaki
    Project Lecturer, Science & Education Center, Ochanomizu University

What Is The Impact of Marine Heatwaves on Marine Ecosystems?

Ben P. Harvey
Assistant Professor, Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba

Marine heatwaves, where seawater temperatures reach extreme temperature for at least five consecutive days, are causing large-scale damage to the health of critical foundation species (corals, seagrasses and kelps) as well as having deleterious impacts across a range of biological processes and taxa. More concerning is that as the oceans continue to warm, marine heatwaves are getting more frequent, hotter, and longer. There is major concern because these extreme events have the potential to alter entire ecosystems and will affect human society by disrupting the goods and services that we derive from our coastal ecosystems within the coming decades.

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The Real Image of Nami no Ihachi, as Seen from an Ocean Perspective

ISHIKAWA Takeo
Director, Kamogawa City Folk Museum, Chiba Prefecture

The works of the Edo era sculptor in wood Ihachi are to be found in many temples and shrines in Chiba prefecture and elsewhere. Following the travels of Ihachi the first, known for his exceptional renderings of waves, we have been able to trace the shipping routes of the time. In this article, I would like to reconsider the famous artist Ihachi, son of the Sotobo coast and Kamogawa, now popular among surfers, from the perspective of the ocean.

Introducing Ocean Education to Landlocked Areas

SATO Hiroaki
Project Lecturer, Science & Education Center, Ochanomizu University

Aiming to promote and establish ocean education in landlocked areas, Ochanomizu University is carrying out research and development into practicable curriculums and teaching materials as well as teacher training programs. From its application in the Kita ward of Tokyo, we have seen the importance for future promotion of ocean education of conveying its clear relevance to other subjects. Along with the importance of curriculum management stressed in the Ministry of Education’s New Course of Study, I would like here to think about the future of ocean education.

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