Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.470 March 5, 2020
  • An Encouragement of “Oceanology”—Learning about the Ocean, Learning from the Ocean
    Yoshiyuki KANEDA
    Director, Center of Regional Resilience Research (Institute of Education, Research and Regional Cooperation for Crisis Management Shikoku)
    Designated Professor, Kagawa University / Recipient, 12th National Maritime Award
  • The Ryukyus in the East Asian Trading Sphere
    Takashi UEZATO
    Director, Urasoe City Library, Okinawa Prefecture
  • Marine Education Programs through School-Museum Collaborations
    Yoshihide ITO
    Director of Museum and Education (Curator), Administrative Section, Marine Science Museum, School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University
    Selected Papers No.25

An Encouragement of “Oceanology”—Learning about the Ocean, Learning from the Ocean

Yoshiyuki KANEDA
Director, Center of Regional Resilience Research (Institute of Education, Research and Regional Cooperation for Crisis Management Shikoku)
Designated Professor, Kagawa University / Recipient, 12th National Maritime Award

70% of our planet’s surface is covered by the ocean. Learning about the wonders and blessings of the ocean, including still undiscovered organisms and bountiful resources, about earth activities in and underneath the ocean, about ocean disasters such as typhoons, high tides, earthquake-tsunamis, and seafloor volcanic eruptions, and understanding the deterioration of the marine environment due to global warming and realizing the need for conservation__ these are critical for our coexistence with the ocean, with the planet, and for thinking about the future of Japan and the world. Oceanology is the practice of learning about the ocean, learning from the ocean.

The Ryukyus in the East Asian Trading Sphere

Takashi UEZATO
Director, Urasoe City Library, Okinawa Prefecture

The Kingdom of the Ryukyus grew to be one of the leading trading countries in East Asia and was well known throughout the region. While no more than a small island country, it made its tributes to the Ming Dynasty an axis for developing a transit trade, and through adapting to the unique diplomatic regimes of the various countries and regions in East Asia developed into a successful trading state. I believe an understanding of the history of the Ryukyus can provide hints for Japan’s international relations.

Marine Education Programs through School-Museum Collaborations

Yoshihide ITO
Director of Museum and Education (Curator), Administrative Section, Marine Science Museum, School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University

The Tokai University Marine Science Museum has set up marine education programs based on its research results and utilizes them for school education and collaboration with local communities. The purpose of these programs is to deepen students’ interests in marine fields and develop individuals who might pursue careers in them. The museum’s education programs currently in use are the Environmental Education Program Utilizing the Deep-sea Lancetfish, Alepisaurus ferox, and the Marine Education Program Utilizing Ocean Plankton and Whitebait. This article introduces these marine education programs which have been designed with Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in mind.
Selected Papers No.25

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