Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Latest

No.507 September 20, 2021
  • IWANAMI Shuichi
    Former Commandant, Japan Coast Guard
  • The Coexistence of Housework and Diplomacy in the Fishing Industries of the Pacific Island Countries
    YAMASHITA Haruko
    Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Daito Bunka University
  • Treatment of Castaways and Water’s Edge Border Control Strategies for Epidemics on Uninhabited Islands in the Edo Period
    HASHIMURA Osamu
    Professor, Division of Humanities and Social Science, Tokyo Gakugei University

The Growth of Coast Guard Agencies Worldwide and the Current Situation on Their Cooperation

IWANAMI Shuichi
Former Commandant, Japan Coast Guard

In recent years, there has been an expansion and universalization of Coast Guard agencies against the background of expanding sea areas under the jurisdiction of coastal states and various changes occurring in the marine environment. The circumstances leading to each Coast Guard agency’s establishment and organizational structure are diverse, but standardization can also be seen, for example, in the naming of agencies. As border-straddling threats and fears of large-scale disasters at sea increase, a new level of cooperation and coordination among Coast Guard agencies is hoped for.

Full Text

The Coexistence of Housework and Diplomacy in the Fishing Industries of the Pacific Island Countries

YAMASHITA Haruko
Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Daito Bunka University

The Pacific Island countries, which possess vast EEZs, have limited land areas and fragile economic infrastructures. As a result, there is a high level of dependency on the fishing industry as both a food source for the people and a platform for diplomacy. The allocation of fishing quotas for offshore tuna fisheries is used as a diplomatic bargaining chip to augment government revenue. Now that policies are prioritizing job creation and societal stability, however, offshore fishing is becoming a domestic industry. Coastal fishing is looked on as a household task, and resources are monitored under the traditional system for fishing rights.

Treatment of Castaways and Water’s Edge Border Control Strategies for Epidemics on Uninhabited Islands in the Edo Period

HASHIMURA Osamu
Professor, Division of Humanities and Social Science, Tokyo Gakugei University

I would like here to introduce water’s edge border control strategies for epidemics in the coastal areas of western Kyushu in the Edo Period, as well as how foreign castaways received different treatment based on their origins; also, how the sick were quarantined on uninhabited islands (the Goto Islands in Nagasaki and Amakusa in Kumamoto). I would also like to examine issues regarding differences in treatment given to people who died from illness and how uninhabited islands are used today.

pagetop