Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.499 May 20, 2021
  • What the Global Ocean Science Report 2020 Tells Us
    SHIRAYAMA Yoshihisa
    Professor Emeritus, Kyoto University / Advisor, JAMSTEC
  • The Large Hydrographic Survey Vessels “Heiyo” and "Koyo” Come into Service: Current Status on the Enhancement of the JCG’s Survey Resources
    TAKASAKA Hisao
    Director, Administration and Planning Division, Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, Japan Coast Guard
  • Monitoring Marine Debris through Biologging
    IWATA Takashi
    Assistant Professor, Faculty of Oceanology/Faculty of Maritime Sciences, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University

What the Global Ocean Science Report 2020 Tells Us

SHIRAYAMA Yoshihisa
Professor Emeritus, Kyoto University / Advisor, JAMSTEC

The Global Ocean Science Report (GOSR) 2020, published by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC) on December 4, 2020, analyzes various aspects of the current situation of ocean science, such as scientific papers, funding, and researchers, and compiles those results. It also includes recommendations, based on the data analysis, regarding measures that each country should consider. I have the highest hopes that the edition’s publication and recommendations will spur ocean science in Japan, a self-professed maritime nation, as well as the global development of ocean science, leading to the successful implementation of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development and achievement of the SDG14.

The Large Hydrographic Survey Vessels “Heiyo” and "Koyo” Come into Service: Current Status on the Enhancement of the JCG’s Survey Resources

TAKASAKA Hisao
Director, Administration and Planning Division, Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, Japan Coast Guard

Two large hydrographic survey vessels, “Heiyo“ and “Koyo“, were commissioned by the Japan Coast Guard in January 2020 and March 2021 respectively for the first time in almost 20 years. The background of the commission, as well as the current status on the Enhancement of the JCG’s survey facilities, starting with the new hydrographic survey vessels that have state-of-the-art research equipment are presented.

Monitoring Marine Debris through Biologging

IWATA Takashi
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Oceanology/Faculty of Maritime Sciences, Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University

Biologging is a method of equipping animals with devices in order to gather information on their ecology. Using this method, it’s possible to conduct a variety of surveys through the use of animals as platforms, such as on the physical marine environment and marine debris. In addition, it’s been shown that biologging is helping to solve various ocean-related problems regarding fishery activities and ecosystem conservation, etc. In the near future, biologging will no doubt become a vital presence for advancing ocean policy.

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