Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.447 March 20, 2019
  • Looking at the Ocean through the Visible and Infrared Sensors of Japan’s New Satellite "Shikisai"
    Joji ISHIZAKA
    Professor, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University
    Hiroshi MURAKAMI
    Senior Researcher, Earth Observation Research Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
  • Efforts towards Creation of an Oyster Farming Pipe Utilizing Biodegradable Plastics
    Kengo FUKUDA
    Division Head, Second Operations Division,"UMI"&"NAGISA"Foundation
  • Project for the Revitalization of "Naniwa Sea" —Regaining a beautiful and bountiful Osaka Bay—
    Koji OTSUKA
    Professor, Graduate School of Humanities and Sustainable System Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University

Looking at the Ocean through the Visible and Infrared Sensors of Japan’s New Satellite "Shikisai"

Joji ISHIZAKA
Professor, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University
Hiroshi MURAKAMI
Senior Researcher, Earth Observation Research Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Data from the Japanese satellite "Shikisai," launched in December 2017, was made available to the public in December 2018. Almost once every two days, the ocean color and sea surface temperature of the global ocean is obtained at a resolution of 250m. Not only does this data make clear the changes occurring in ocean ecosystems due to climate change, there are also expectations that the high spatio-temporal resolution can be used practically in coastal areas.

Efforts towards Creation of an Oyster Farming Pipe Utilizing Biodegradable Plastics

Kengo FUKUDA
Division Head, Second Operations Division,"UMI"&"NAGISA"Foundation

Oyster farming utilizes several plastic materials including oyster pipes (20cm-long polyethylene tubes to provide spaces for farmed oysters) and styrofoam floats of oyster rafts. The number of oyster pipes used in Hiroshima Bay are estimated to be more than 200million, and some of them are lost due to ship collisions. Introduction of biodegradable materials used for oyster pipes could reduce the environmental problems associated with the lost and drifted pipes. To identify the strength of biodegradable oyster pipes, strength tests have been conducted since 2018, in addition to exiting studies to reduce pollutions caused by broken styrofoam floats.

Project for the Revitalization of "Naniwa Sea" —Regaining a beautiful and bountiful Osaka Bay—

Koji OTSUKA
Professor, Graduate School of Humanities and Sustainable System Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University

While Osaka Bay is strongly associated with eutrophication from the economic boom period, in recent years the western and southern parts of the bay have actually seen a substantial decrease in nutrition, with impacts on fisheries including the loss of color from seaweed. With the aim of bringing back the bountiful Osaka Bay that was an intimate part of our daily lives, to the extent of calling it "Naniwa," ("fish garden") this project is based in southern Osaka Bay, and carries out comprehensive efforts including the creation of fisheries through alimentation, development of a fisheries distribution system through use of IT, and the conducting of events to promote fish consumption among youth.

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