Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Latest

No.437 October 20, 2018
  • Development of a Floating Offshore Marine Current Power System and the Conducting of Operational Tests Offshore
    Shigeki NAGAYA
    Manager, Maritime Engineering Group, Products Development Center, IHI Corporation
    Selected Papers No.24
  • Resource Trends in Fish Popular with the Public
    Yoshiro WATANABE
    Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo
  • Hopes for Utilizing Lighthouses as a Tourism Resource
    Mayuu FUDO
    Editor in Chief, Toudai Doudai

Development of a Floating Offshore Marine Current Power System and the Conducting of Operational Tests Offshore

Shigeki NAGAYA
Manager, Maritime Engineering Group, Products Development Center, IHI Corporation

Ocean current power, an example of ocean renewable energy, is a renewable energy technology that aligns well with Japan's aims for effective utilization of the "Kuroshio" current. In August 2017, IHI Corporation and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Department Organization (NEDO) conducted an experimental test off the shore of Kuchinoshima in Kagoshima Prefecture, and gained data that can be utilized for future operationalization. The 100kW is one of the largest device for ocean current in the world. Here, I will give an overview on the world's first floating offshore ocean current power system.
Selected Papers No.24

Resource Trends in Fish Popular with the Public

Yoshiro WATANABE
Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo

Taishugyo, fish popular with the public that are captured in large amounts and end up daily on our kitchen tables, are small pelagic fish that feed on zooplankton. While taishugyo are often referred to as magusa (grass eaten by horses or cows) fish, they are better referred to as carnivores rather than herbivores. In the ecological system, they are produced from condensing 100 times the solar energy provided by phytoplankton. Taishugyo show large variations in resource production, with the size of the variation depending on the ecological characteristics of each fish species. The resource management of Taishugyo, which sees large-scale natural variations, is an important issue to be addressed.

Hopes for Utilizing Lighthouses as a Tourism Resource

Mayuu FUDO
Editor in Chief, Toudai Doudai

While Japanese-style lighthouses have existed in Japan since before the Edo Period, the Western-style lighthouses that continue to be seen today were created from the beginning of the Meiji Period. 150 years have passed since then, and we are now in a period that questions the meaning of having lighthouses. There are hopes for local community organizations to promote utilization of lighthouses for tourism. As a fan of lighthouses, I would like to spread their cultural meaning and appeal.

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