Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.441 December 20, 2018
  • Launch of the Japan Coast Guard Mobile Cooperation Team (MCT)
    Akira KURAMOTO
    Director for Coast Guard International Cooperation, Administration Department, Japan Coast Guard
  • Safe Utilization of the Seashores and Understanding Rip Currents—Hopes to decrease drowning accidents in Japan and the world, hopes to save precious lives—
    Ryuichiro NISHI
    Professor, Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University / Recipient, 11th National Maritime Award
  • Thinking about Tokyo 2020 from the Oceans—Myself, the Ocean, and Tokyo—
    Taro SHIRATO
    Sports Navigator / President and Representative Director, Athlonia / Member, Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly / Member, Special Committee on Measures to Promote Olympic and Paralympic Games

Launch of the Japan Coast Guard Mobile Cooperation Team (MCT)

Akira KURAMOTO
Director for Coast Guard International Cooperation, Administration Department, Japan Coast Guard

For more than 40 years, the Japan Coast Guard has continuously provided support for capacity building to coastal countries in the Asia region, among others, regarding maritime safety and security. Launched in October 2017, the “Japan Coast Guard Mobile Cooperation Team (MCT)” is a department that specializes in support for capacity building efforts. As of December 20, 2018, 54 members including from the MCT have been dispatched on 15 missions to eight countries, carrying out efforts for improvement of maritime safety and security capacities in the Indo-Pacific region to “connect the oceans.”

Safe Utilization of the Seashores and Understanding Rip Currents—Hopes to decrease drowning accidents in Japan and the world, hopes to save precious lives—

Ryuichiro NISHI
Professor, Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University / Recipient, 11th National Maritime Award

Many precious lives are lost just off our seashores. In order to decrease the number of drowning accidents, there is a need to conduct research in the coastal waters where the accidents happened, and accumulate onsite knowledge. Along with organizations including the Japan Coast Guard, I conducted research around Japan regarding offshore currents (rip currents, reef currents, etc.) that would present dangers to users of such waters, focusing on the sandy beaches, coral reefs, river mouths and inlets (lake mouths) where drowning accidents had taken place. I also conducted seminars and on site briefings for lifesavers and other officials in more than 20 sites around the country. Here, I would like to introduce some efforts and activities for the safe use of our coastal waters.

Thinking about Tokyo 2020 from the Oceans—Myself, the Ocean, and Tokyo—

Taro SHIRATO
Sports Navigator / President and Representative Director, Athlonia / Member, Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly / Member, Special Committee on Measures to Promote Olympic and Paralympic Games

The Olympic and Paralympic Games will come to Tokyo in 2020. While many reports have focused solely on the hosting fees, I believe that it is more important to consider how the Games may give us an opportunity to change our lives and ways of thinking, and could bring a chance for Japanese people to mature socially. The ocean will be utilized as a venue for the Games, with the Open Water Swim to take place in the waters around Odaiba. However, as the water there is still far from being in a suitable condition for swimming, more cleanup efforts are needed. I hope that the water quality in Odaiba will see improvements by 2020.

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