Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.438 November 5, 2018
  • Creation of the 2nd Taketomi Basic Plan on Ocean Policy ?A town living in harmony with churaumi (beautiful ocean)?
    Taichiro TOUJI
    Director, Policy Promotion Division, Taketomi Town Government, Okinawa Prefecture
  • Gender Equality to Bring Innovation to the Ocean Field
    Momoko KITADA
    Associate Professor, World Maritime University (WMU)
  • Thoughts on Red Tide Countermeasures Based on Long-term Monitoring of the Tidelands of Tokyo Bay
    Kazuyuki YAMADA
    Freelancer (Monitoring ecosystems on seafloor) / Project Assistant, The University Museum, The University of Tokyo

Creation of the 2nd Taketomi Basic Plan on Ocean Policy ?A town living in harmony with churaumi (beautiful ocean)?

Taichiro TOUJI
Director, Policy Promotion Division, Taketomi Town Government, Okinawa Prefecture

Taketomi Town created Japan's first local government-level Basic Plan on Ocean Policy. While there have been successes in implementing each of the policies, situations surrounding the town have changed. Keeping in mind the role of the town government, we are currently revising the "Taketomi-cho Basic Plan on Ocean Policy" in order to rapidly response to these changes.

Gender Equality to Bring Innovation to the Ocean Field

Momoko KITADA
Associate Professor, World Maritime University (WMU)

New ideas that go beyond existing thinking and values, otherwise known as innovation, are crucial elements for realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs). Gender equality could be the key approach to bringing innovation to the ocean and maritime fields, which traditionally have been dominated by men.

Thoughts on Red Tide Countermeasures Based on Long-term Monitoring of the Tidelands of Tokyo Bay

Kazuyuki YAMADA
Freelancer (Monitoring ecosystems on seafloor) / Project Assistant, The University Museum, The University of Tokyo

Red tides cannot be eliminated solely through their removal by humans. As long as the functions necessary to the metropolitan area are maintained, red tides will continue to be reproduced. However, by looking at them from another perspective, they could also become a source of nutrition for organisms. While humans cannot directly utilize red tides, they can change them into a form usable as food for filter feeders, such as clams, including the Asari clam. Might it be possible to harness red tides for use in production?

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