Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.427 May 20, 2018
  • Concern over Deoxygenation in Japan's Seabed—Its Relationship with Global Warming
    Takafumi ARAMAKI
    Senior Researcher, Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies
  • Drug-resistant Bacteria in the Oceans: Where Do They Come from, and Where Do They Go?
    Satoru SUZUKI
    Professor, Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University
    Selected Papers No.23
  • Efforts on Ocean Education in “General Course” Senior High Schools—The Search for Classes That Will Increase Curiosity and Interest in The Oceans—
    Takafumi SHIKANO
    Former Teacher at Meiji Gakuen Junior and Senior High School

Concern over Deoxygenation in Japan's Seabed—Its Relationship with Global Warming

Takafumi ARAMAKI
Senior Researcher, Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies

While the Sea of Japan is a highly enclosed sea, its deep sea zone is rich in oxygen. This is due to the Sea of Japan's unique sea water circulation system. However, the oxygen level in these deep seas has been decreasing over the past 50 years. Here, I will address the decreasing trend of dissolved oxygen in the deep sea zones of the Sea of Japan, as well as its relationship with global warming.

Drug-resistant Bacteria in the Oceans: Where Do They Come from, and Where Do They Go?

Satoru SUZUKI
Professor, Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University

Drug resistance genes can be found even in the ocean, which are derived from humans and other animals, as well as remaining ones in aquaculture sites. In addition, it is now thought that drug resistance genes unique to the ocean may also exist. The ocean has become a massive depository for resistance genes. How much of a risk is this? Much remains to be solved.
Selected Papers No.23

Efforts on Ocean Education in “General Course” Senior High Schools—The Search for Classes That Will Increase Curiosity and Interest in The Oceans—

Takafumi SHIKANO
Former Teacher at Meiji Gakuen Junior and Senior High School

While ocean education in elementary and junior high school can be taught through standardized content and methods, in senior high school the class must have meaning for the development of students through bringing out their curiosity and interest in the ocean, and also be readily accepted in the school environment by, for example, being useful for entrance exams for higher education. Here I will propose model curriculums on ocean education in the hopes that new efforts on ocean education will also increase in “general course” (Futsuuka) senior high schools.

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