Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.417 December 20, 2017
  • Considering Ways Forward for Japan's EEZ Management from the Perspective of MPAs in the United States
    Eka HIGUCHI
    Lecturer, Tohoku University of Community Service and Science
  • Japan’s Resource Strategy Based on Development of REY-rich Mud around Minamitorishima Island
    Yasuhiro KATO
    Professor, Frontier Research Center for Energy and Resources, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
  • On UNEP’s Regional Seas Programme
    Kanako HASEGAWA
    Associate Program Officer, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Considering Ways Forward for Japan's EEZ Management from the Perspective of MPAs in the United States

Eka HIGUCHI
Lecturer, Tohoku University of Community Service and Science

Shipping, fisheries, conservation and restoration of ecosystems, protection of habitats for marine creatures, and national security are some of the various sectors with stakes in marine areas including the EEZ. In the United States, local community organizations consisting of various stakeholders came together to create the “Coastal and Marine Spatial Plan” in a bottom-up manner, and have moved forward with its implementation following agreement and support from the federal government. Such a balanced framework could be useful for Japan's coastal and EEZ management in future.

Japan’s Resource Strategy Based on Development of REY-rich Mud around Minamitorishima Island

Yasuhiro KATO
Professor, Frontier Research Center for Energy and Resources, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

We found deep-sea mud extremely enriched in rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY) within the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) surrounding Minamitorishima Island. Japan could achieve sustainable economic development and resource security via fully utilizing the REY-rich mud as a new national resource in the Minamitorishima EEZ and establishing a domestic supply chain stretching from “resource-mining” to “manufacturing”.

On UNEP’s Regional Seas Programme

Kanako HASEGAWA
Associate Program Officer, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

In the 40 years since the inception of the organization, the United Nations Environment Program’s (UNEP) “Regional Seas Programme,” launched in 1974, is thought to be one of the most important achievements. Originally launched with a focus on marine pollution, the program is currently implemented in 18 regions, working on a wide range of problems such as biodiversity conservation and integrated coastal management. Here, I will introduce and give specific examples of UNEP’s Regional Seas Programme, and also consider the way forward for regional seas, taking into account the discussions on marine biological diversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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