Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.411 September 20, 2017
  • Overseas Purse Seine Fishing and Resource Management
    Akira NAKAMAE
    President, Japan Far Seas Purse Seine Fishing Association
  • Crossing to Japan's Easternmost Minamitorishima Island
    Tomohiro KUWAE
    Head, Coastal and Estuarine Environment Research Group, Port and Airport Research Institute, National Institute of Maritime, Port and Aviation Technology
  • 20 Years Since the Nakhodka Oil Spill —Environmental Disasters in the 21st Century and Our Mission—
    Shin ONUKI
    Chairman, Japan Environmental Disaster Information Center

Overseas Purse Seine Fishing and Resource Management

Akira NAKAMAE
President, Japan Far Seas Purse Seine Fishing Association

Japan far seas purse seine fishing is an important form of overseas fishing, as it contributes more than 70% of the skipjack tuna catch that is used for bonito flakes ("katsuobushi") and additives for condiments that form the base of Japanese cuisine. While international management of skipjack tuna and other target fish is being undertaken, the results are less than satisfactory. At the end of this year, reviews of regulations for fishery resource management organizations will be conducted. We hope for the introduction of appropriate management measures that can help to secure the sustainable use of these important resources.

Crossing to Japan's Easternmost Minamitorishima Island

Tomohiro KUWAE
Head, Coastal and Estuarine Environment Research Group, Port and Airport Research Institute, National Institute of Maritime, Port and Aviation Technology

In Minamitorishima Island, remote from mainland Japan, harbor facilities are being built for use as a base for activities, in order to exercise our sovereign rights for natural resource development within the EEZ, and fulfill obligations regarding the conservation of our ocean environment. Here, I will report on what was observed during a trip to Minamitorishima Island, conducted for research on the above project.

20 Years Since the Nakhodka Oil Spill —Environmental Disasters in the 21st Century and Our Mission—

Shin ONUKI
Chairman, Japan Environmental Disaster Information Center

It has been 20 years since the Nakhodka Oil Spill. Since then, there have not been any severe oil spill incidents in Japan that could be classified as environmental disasters. In order for humans to continue sustainable co-existence with oil, educating and passing on information to the next generation in the event of an accident will be key. Especially as people who experienced the Nakhodka Oil Spill, we feel that it is our purpose to accurately convey the lessons learned to the next generation.

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