Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.406 July 5, 2017
  • Exploring Oceans and Life in the Solar System
    Yasuhito SEKINE
    Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo
    Selected Papers No.22
  • Considering "International Resource Management Certifications" from a Producer's Point of View
    Reiko OMOTO
    Lecturer, Center for Collaborative Research and Community Cooperation, Miyazaki University
  • The Safety of Beaches Guarded by Lifesavers and a Look Towards the Future
    Takahiko KOYAMA
    Member, Japan Lifesaving Association

Exploring Oceans and Life in the Solar System

Yasuhito SEKINE
Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo

According to recent studies, it has become apparent that several objects in the solar system have, or used to have, liquid oceans. In recent years, such extraterrestrial liquid oceans have been subjected to sampling and analysis, ushering in a new era of exploring oceans and life in outer space. Here, I will focus on Saturn's moon Enceladus and introduce current discussions regarding probes for underground seas and the possibility of life.
Selected Papers No.22

Considering "International Resource Management Certifications" from a Producer's Point of View

Reiko OMOTO
Lecturer, Center for Collaborative Research and Community Cooperation, Miyazaki University

"International Resource Management Certifications" are aimed at distributing the "universal value" concerning the sustainability of resources being traded internationally. Originally, in fact, the certification method and eco-labels were created as tools to help consumers; that is, to help consumers and businesses make sustainable choices. While it has been over 20 years since the issuing of certification methods for resource management began, I would like here to introduce the producer's point of view on the active use of international resource management certifications. The safety of beaches guarded by lifesavers and a look towards the future

The Safety of Beaches Guarded by Lifesavers and a Look Towards the Future

Takahiko KOYAMA
Member, Japan Lifesaving Association

In places all over the country, people known as lifesavers take part in efforts to protect the safety of public beaches filled with visitors. Conducted in close relation with local community organizations and residents in coastal areas, the importance of this undertaking, whose purpose is to immediately take action in the event of an accident or disaster, is of sufficient importance to be considered a "public mission." On the other hand, these activities also pose potential dangers to the lives of the lifesavers themselves. It could be said that those working in relation to activities on the beach should tirelessly pursue appropriate safety measures, including legal ones.

pagetop