Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.399 March 20, 2017
  • Reconstruction of the Sanriku Region's Salmon Industry —Maintenance of Cyclicity and Regional Fisheries—
    Masahiro YAMAO
    Professor, Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University
  • From the Fishing Villages of Tohoku
    Kazuhiro KOGURE
    Professor, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo / Director, Operations, Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences (TEAMS)
  • Training Next Generation Specialists through "Learning and Working in the Local Community" —Shipping education at Imabari Technical High School—
    Makoto NISHIOKA
    Principal, Ehime Prefectural Imabari Technical High School

Reconstruction of the Sanriku Region's Salmon Industry —Maintenance of Cyclicity and Regional Fisheries—

Masahiro YAMAO
Professor, Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University

While the Great East Japan Earthquake caused damage to many fisheries industries, the Sanriku region's salmon industry, with its mantra of "putting salmon fishing at the starting point of reconstruction," has placed priority on recovery efforts for large-scale fixed trap fishing as well as hatcheries. However, while the hatcheries have been rebuilt through these reconstruction efforts, the fish catch still remains below what it was, leading to a phenomenon where community-level fisheries industries have shied away from salmon, and showing that the industry is far from achieving stability. In order to achieve a stable fish catch, we hope that the hatcheries business continues its smooth recovery, and leads to conditions where resources are in continuous supply.

From the Fishing Villages of Tohoku

Kazuhiro KOGURE
Professor, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo / Director, Operations, Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences (TEAMS)

Through the Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences (TEAMS) movement, we have seen more than just how fishing villages are struggling in the Tohoku region, which is dependent on primary industries. Rather, as they place excessive expectations on conventional development of industries, they are neglecting primary industries and creating a vulnerable and dangerous urban-like situation in which they are relying completely on outside sources for energy and food resources.

Training Next Generation Specialists through "Learning and Working in the Local Community" —Shipping education at Imabari Technical High School—

Makoto NISHIOKA
Principal, Ehime Prefectural Imabari Technical High School

Imabari Technical High School established its Machine and Shipbuilding Course in 2016, and received the "Super Professional High School" designation from the Ministry of Education. Through collaboration between industry, government and academia, we are expanding our learning spaces to regional communities, and carrying out shipping education that effectively utilizes educational resources of the communities. We look to educate next generation specialists for Ehime, known as the "Shipbuilding Kingdom," and in the process also contribute to the revitalization of local communities and the region.

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