Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.387 September 20, 2016
  • Conrad C. LAUTENBACHER, Jr.
    Chief Executive Officer and Director, GeoOptics Inc. / Former Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator
    Selected Papers No.21
  • The Origins of the "Tachibana"
    Sayuri TERAMOTO
    Ethiopia Office, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
  • The Psychoanalysis of Tokyo Bay
    Hiroaki SUGINO
    Project Researcher, The University of Tokyo Ocean Alliance

The Ocean and Our Future

Conrad C. LAUTENBACHER, Jr.
Chief Executive Officer and Director, GeoOptics Inc. / Former Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator

The Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) is the instrumentation infrastructure needed for earth scientists of all specialties around the world to discover and document the knowledge necessary for a sustainable human presence on earth. The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the USA have cooperated on the Tropical Pacific Observing System, a part of GEOSS, but continuous monitoring is needed for prediction of weather change and variability around the world, and, furthermore, it is important to develop new systems, including for observation of biogeochemical variability.
Selected Papers No.21

Full Text

The Origins of the "Tachibana"

Sayuri TERAMOTO
Ethiopia Office, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

Since ancient times, the "Tachibana," or mandarin orange, has been widely appreciated as a fragrant citrus, and has also had deep ties with the ocean and imperial family. While they have grown in the wild for many years, ancient texts document the importation of the fruit, giving rise to many different theories as to its origin. After taking into account all the factors we can infer from traditional lore, the fruit's actual distribution, the presence of variant species, as well as the successes of recent research on gene mapping, we believe it likely that the Tachibana in its current form entered the Japanese archipelago through both human means and from natural propagation.

The Psychoanalysis of Tokyo Bay

Hiroaki SUGINO
Project Researcher, The University of Tokyo Ocean Alliance

On comparing Tokyo Bay to an organism with a personality and subjecting it to psychoanalysis, I discovered complexes at its unconscious level that I would like to introduce here. If we take Tokyo Bay as a single organism and think about its development as well as its issues to be resolved, it is important to consider the complexes it is burdened with, just as a human development support professional would include a person's complexes when considering their individuality.

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