Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.382 July 5, 2016
  • On Developing Environmentally Friendly and Economically Efficient Ships
    Koichiro MATSUMOTO
    Head, Technical Research Center, Japan Marine United Corporation / Recipient, 8th National Maritime Award
  • The Past and Future of Fisheries Management
    Kanae TOKUNAGA
    Project Researcher, The University of Tokyo Ocean Alliance
  • The Role of Veterinarians at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium
    Keiichi UEDA
    Veterinarian, Okinawa Churashima Foundation
    Makio YANAGISAWA
    Veterinarian, Okinawa Churashima Foundation

On Developing Environmentally Friendly and Economically Efficient Ships

Koichiro MATSUMOTO
Head, Technical Research Center, Japan Marine United Corporation / Recipient, 8th National Maritime Award

The superiority of Japanese shipbuilding is due to the strength of its continuous development of energy saving technologies. Japan has lead the world in implementation of technological development, from that in still water to actual ocean conditions and from the development of both hard and soft technologies. It is important in future that Japan also lead the world in developing technologies to optimize all facets of navigation at sea and to create global standards for related technologies.

The Past and Future of Fisheries Management

Kanae TOKUNAGA
Project Researcher, The University of Tokyo Ocean Alliance

Why is fishery management necessary? What kinds of methods are used? This article will explain the Individual Transferable Quota (ITQ) and Territorial Use Rights for Fishing (TURF) systems, both originating from a field in Economics. In order to effectively carry out joint fisheries management, as seen in Japan's coastal fisheries and elsewhere, I believe it necessary to examine examples of social relations capital, such as local ties and information sharing, themes not previously taken up in discussing fishery management.

The Role of Veterinarians at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium

Keiichi UEDA
Veterinarian, Okinawa Churashima Foundation
Makio YANAGISAWA
Veterinarian, Okinawa Churashima Foundation

For those aquatic animals whose lives are spent underwater, unique difficulties are encountered in treatment compared with their terrestrial counterparts. But for both, being raised in aquariums and other facilities means that original ideas are often needed for examinations and treatment to deal with their illnesses. At the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, a dolphin was successfully put under full body anesthetic, a first in Japan, and underwater ultrasonic imaging is also being used in diagnoses. This article introduces some of the initiatives being undertaken by veterinarians in the health management and treatment of aquatic animals.

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