Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.381 June 20, 2016
  • Advisory Jurisdiction of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea
    Atsuko KANEHARA
    Professor, Faculty of Law, Sophia University
  • Towards More Sustainable Fishing
    Kozo ISHII
    Program Director Japan, Marine Stewardship Council
  • The Katsuobushi Loved by the Japanese
    Yoshihiro FUNAKI
    Secretariat, Japan Katsuobushi Association
    Selected Papers No.21

Advisory Jurisdiction of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea

Atsuko KANEHARA
Professor, Faculty of Law, Sophia University

On April 2nd of 2015 the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS) itself affirmed its jurisdiction to give advisory opinions. Neither UNCLOS, which established ITLOS, nor ITLOS's own Rules of the Tribunal, which regulates its jurisdiction, organization, and procedures, explicitly recognizes such jurisdiction. This article examines the logic employed by ITLOS in demonstrating such assertiveness over its jurisdiction while at the same time maintaining the importance of agreement by States Parties.

Towards More Sustainable Fishing

Kozo ISHII
Program Director Japan, Marine Stewardship Council

In recent years, with the worldwide growth in fish consumption, there have arisen worries over the depletion of marine resources. To ensure that the limited bounties of the ocean are passed on to future generations, the popularization of sustainable fishing practices is essential. The Marine Stewardship Council's certification system and marine eco-labeling are initiatives that will spread sustainable fishing practices and their products through the purchasing preferences of consumers.

The Katsuobushi Loved by the Japanese

Yoshihiro FUNAKI
Secretariat, Japan Katsuobushi Association

To the question of what is Japanese cuisine, Katsuobushi(smoke-dried skipjack tuna) and Konbu(dried kelp) are more likely to be given in reply before the names of individual dishes. This is because they are key ingredients in soup stocks, which are the basis of Japanese cuisine, and so feature in a wide variety of dishes. While there is much clamor about the Westernization of Japanese food, the fact that the phrases "Katsuobushi dashi" (skipjack soup stock) and "Kezuri bushi" (shavings of Katsuobushi) are to be seen in all kinds of food products reflects the centuries-long love of the Japanese people for Katsuobushi and its unshakeable place in the local diet. This article introduces its history and current production conditions as well the activities of the Japan Katsuobushi Association.
Selected Papers No.21

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