Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.308 June 5, 2013
  • Development of Offshore Wind Energy in Japan
    Hideyuki SUZUKI
    Professor, Department of Ocean Technology, Policy and Development, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Frontier Sciences
  • Visualization of Marine Organic Resources
    Tomonari AKAMATSU
    Group Head, Energy Management and bioengineering Group, National Research Institute of Fisheries Engineering
  • The Future of the International Shark Protection Movement
    Takashi SUZUKI
    Adjunct Lecturer, St. Andrew’s University

Development of Offshore Wind Energy in Japan

Hideyuki SUZUKI
Professor, Department of Ocean Technology, Policy and Development, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Frontier Sciences

Among Japan's development of renewable energy, offshore wind energy is drawing attention from resource and cost perspectives. In this article, I introduce the estimated amount of resources to be produced, projected scale of the industry, and the global competition to develop floating wind turbines.

Visualization of Marine Organic Resources

Tomonari AKAMATSU
Group Head, Energy Management and bioengineering Group, National Research Institute of Fisheries Engineering

While it is becoming important in fishery resource management to know how many of a certain species and size of fish are in the ocean, fish echosounder technology to date has not been able to meet this need. However, research is progressing on a new technology using wide-band sound that will provide the precise location of a target fish.

The Future of the International Shark Protection Movement

Takashi SUZUKI
Adjunct Lecturer, St. Andrew’s University

At this year's Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Washington Convention), 5 species of shark were added to Appendix II. This is the fruit of a shark conservation movement organized by international NGOs to protect sharks from "finning, Ein which only the fins are removed from sharks and their body thrown back into the ocean. However, the shark conservation movement didn't end with the banning of finning, but has resulted in a law prohibiting the possession, sale, and provision of shark fins. Nevertheless, international disputes over sharks and shark fins might arise again in future. Keeping in mind our experience with the whaling issue, before emotions clash I believe we should make proposals concerning the sustainable use and management of sharks and shark fins from the perspectives of science and culture.

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