Ocean Newsletter

【Ocean Newsletter】Back issues

No.175 November 20, 2007
  • Flood Simulation Systems for Personal Computers
    Satoshi Yamaguchi
    Intelligent Systems Research, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd.
  • The Production of Bio-fuel from Seaweed: Using Japan's Unique Technology to Establish a New Fuel Source
    Masahiro Notoya
    Professor, Department of Marine Biosciences, Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
  • Maso: The Goddess of the Sea
    Yuko Mio
    Professor, Research Institute of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies

Flood Simulation Systems for Personal Computers

Satoshi Yamaguchi
Intelligent Systems Research, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd.

Improvement in personal computing performance seems to know no bounds. While flood simulation systems used to require a supercomputer, high speed modeling is now possible on personal computers. In this paper, I would like report on the current progress and use of the latest disaster simulation systems developed by Hitachi's Central Research Laboratory for disaster prevention purposes. I would also like to propose their application in the case of coastal area disasters, the risk of which is thought to be increasing due to rising sea levels caused by global warming.

The Production of Bio-fuel from Seaweed: Using Japan's Unique Technology to Establish a New Fuel Source

Masahiro Notoya
Professor, Department of Marine Biosciences, Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology

Seaweed holds an important position in coastal ecosystems as a primary product, playing a role in the maintenance, restoration, and conservation of seafood resources. It has been shown that by using the fertility and functions of artificially introduced 'drifting seaweed E carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can be recycled, the living resources accompanying 'drifting seaweed Ecan be conserved, and eutrophic ocean areas can be cleansed. It is important to remember Applied Algology research when thinking about the effective use of coastal and ocean resources and conservation of the marine environment.

Maso: The Goddess of the Sea

Yuko Mio
Professor, Research Institute of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies

In the latter half of the 10th century, a woman who served as no more than a local priestess on the coast of Fujian province in China became an object to faith to regional seafarers and their protector goddess. That is the origin of Maso. Her faith has now spread beyond China to Taiwan and Southeast Asia, where Maso shrines can be found and where she is worshipped not only as a goddess of the sea but of profit in general. Maso affords us a wider view of the East Asian world from an ocean perspective.

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